July 2017

by Anne  Chambers

What a contrast to last year when we had low temperatures and plenty of rain in June and early July.   Since I last wrote we have had a blistering ten days of heat when everything has burst into flower but faded far too quickly.  Now we really badly need some rain as everything is a good fortnight earlier than normal with hydrangeas and Japanese anenomes beginning to flower in early July instead of August!  I am already worrying what there will be to come in the autumn!

The one group of small tree or large shrub that has performed really well are the cornuses, one of my favourites.  The cornus ‘Kenwyn Clapp’ on the side of the car park has been much admired, starting with large white flowers it then progresses to a deep pink and has been in flower for over a month. 

Cornus Kenwyn Clapp

Cornus Kenwyn Clapp

The perennial wild flower meadow has changed completely from May and now some of the scabies, umbellifers and later wild flowers have come into their own.  We are continuing planting plugs in here and it will be interesting to see how this area progresses.

Wild flowers in late June

Wild flowers in late June

The roses were wonderful but as I said earlier lasted far too short a time and the Kiftsgate rose has never flowered so early.  It is now over and we have been doing a lot of dead heading.  Quite a few will come again and I am particularly pleased with rosa Vanity which I planted last year and is already climbing into the magnolia at the end of the wide border.

Lobelias are a really useful end of summer family and the lobelia bridgesii is looking particularly good at the moment.  We have also planted L. Queen Victoria and Russian Princess.  L. Fanfare Scarlet and Hadspen Purple survived well in the borders over the winter and add a good splash of colour in August.

Lobelia bridgesii

Lobelia bridgesii

Keeping fingers crossed for some rain whilst I am off to America next week to await the birth of our first grandchild, a very exciting prospect.

 

June 2017

By Anne Chambers

I knew it was too good to last and this week we have been hit by gale force winds and torrential rain, not what you want in June.  Amazingly the garden has stood up to natures forces very well but the herbaceous peonies have not lasted as long as usual and the abutilons in the lower garden have been sorely tested.

The perennial meadow has been looking lovely with the allium purple sensation and the yellow buttercups making a wonderful display.  Next week we will be dead heading the buttercup and digging up quite a few, otherwise all the other wild flowers will be overcome and choked by them.

 

Buttercups and alliums in the wild garden

Buttercups and alliums in the wild garden

Our new oak benches have arrived for the new mound area and look terrific.  Nicky Hodges who has made all the seats and benches in the garden has done a brilliant job and it is lovely now to be able to sit and enjoy the vista up the tulip tree avenue to the sculpture, (not that we do very much sitting!).

Nicky Hodges' benches

Nicky Hodges' benches

The bush honeysuckles which are always much admired in the garden are flowering well and the combination with the dark purple campanula and pale lilac geranium robustum make an attractive grouping in the four squares.  Visitors often comment on the colour combinations in the garden and this is very important to us although sometimes it is more by luck than skill.

 

Geranium robustum in the four squares

Geranium robustum in the four squares

Visitors from as far afield as Finland and Argentina are visiting us at the moment and we are preparing for our most hectic time in the garden with lots of buses and the much anticipated flowering of the Kiftsgate rose.

May 2017

by Anne Chambers

What a dry Spring, we really need the rain now to bulk up everything and refresh the garden.  Having had such a hot April it is now much cooler with an easterly wind which is unusual and again very drying.

Our big excitement is the opening of our new garden area which we have been working on for a few years and is now nearly finished.  This came about after we had made the modern pond garden in 2000 when we had one thousand tons of soil dumped in the orchard.  We have moulded it into a horseshow shape which has been turfed.  Rosa rugosa roses in pink and white form a hedge around the outside of the mound and the outside slope has been planted with a prostrate cotoneaster to hide the black plastic covering.

The mound

The mound

 

 A tulip tree avenue was planted five years ago which leads to a statue by Pete Moorhouse of a leaf in stainless steel with veins replaced by an Islamic pattern taken from the Huand Hatun mosque in Kayseri, Turkey.  Inside the horseshoe is a chevron pattern of coloured stones and four olive trees planted in containers which we bought for our daughter’s wedding!

The statue

The statue

 

Leading from the fern border you walk through a perennial wild flower garden with the established cornus controversa Pagoda and a very productive plum tree presented to us by the Worshipful Company of Fruiterers. On through a new iron gate you enter the orchard with old and new fruit trees.  Camassias and tulip Jan Reus have been planted in the grass and will be continued to be added to over the next few years.

 

The orchard

The orchard

I am delighted with rosa La Follette which is flowering really well and covering the roofs of the ladies loo!  Such a stunning tender rose which I first saw in the South of France and never thought would flourish here in our colder climate.

Rose La Follette

Rose La Follette

 

Looking ahead we are hosting a sculpture exhibition by the Oxford Sculpture Group from Saturday 19th August until Wednesday 6th September.  Around one hundred pieces will be displayed in the garden and their website for more information is www.oxfordsculptors.org .

 

April 2017

by anne chambers

Perhaps it is my memory lapsing but I cannot remember such a wonderful spring!  Really warm temperatures and no frost so the magnolias were magnificent and everything has burst out almost three weeks early.  We now need a little rain but as it is Easter weekend it can wait until next week.

The bluebells are unusually early and looking stunning. They will nearly be over by the beginning of May when they should just be starting. 

 

Early bluebells (and Willa)

Early bluebells (and Willa)

Not a daffodil left but again they flowered brilliantly, in fact everything has performed above and beyond to make this spring so special.

This year I planted a new variety of tulip in the pots called Purple Dream and as you can see it is looking lovely. 

 

Tulip Purple Dreams

Tulip Purple Dreams

Some of the other tulips are not as tall as normal but I am putting this down to the lack of rain.  The ballerina tulips in the yellow border have flowered again from last year which is very encouraging as so many come up blind in their second year.

As I mentioned earlier in my diary we pruned the roses extra hard this year and you will see from the photo how we train them into different shapes with iron and wooden structures. 

 

Tying down the roses

Tying down the roses

I went to an excellent lecture at The Gardens Illustrated weekend at Westonbirt and heard Troy Scott Smith head gardener at Sissinghurst give a talk about all the roses that they have replanted and replaced there.  He was saying that they too use this same system to “pull” the new growth down horizontally to increase the number of flowers.

Just a reminder that the season ticket at £22.00 is an excellent way of seeing the garden throughout the season and by May we will be open five days a week. 

 

March 2017

by Anne Chambers

Only a few days till our opening at the beginning of April and quite a few last minute jobs to be done before we are completely ready for another season.

As it was raining today I tackled the shop which I emptied in October and stored away over winter.  A mass of large boxes have been delivered over the past weeks with all the new stock so it was rather like Christmas, unpacking all the items, pricing them and then re arranging in our tiny space ready for opening.

Pop up shop

Pop up shop

 

I had a very enjoyable day out listening to Sarah Raven talking about her cutting garden at Perch Hill.  A completely different kind of gardening to here but still learnt a lot especially about annuals and dahlias.  I had no idea there were so many varieties, shapes and colours of dahlias and came away with a selection from her pop up shop to experiment in a dahlia bed in the kitchen garden.  It is always stimulating to get new ideas and at the same time be supporting an excellent charity, the Gynaecological cancer fund Lady Gardener Campaign.

The garden is really moving now with the daffodils out and leaves appearing on the trees.  The armandii clematis around the small pond in the lower garden is flowering spectacularly after our relatively mild winter.  I love this time of year with all the promise of things to come and the evenings getting lighter.

Clematis armandii

Clematis armandii

 

Talking of things to come, I have been pollinating the apricot and nectarine trees in the greenhouses with a rabbit’s tail.  This is a really old fashioned pastime but very effective for a bumper crop in the summer.  The blossom is so pretty and at this time of year bees are scarce so it just helps ensure success.  There is nothing better than a home grown apricot or nectarine warm from the tree, something again to look forward to!

Pollination with a rabbit's tail

Pollination with a rabbit's tail

 

We have cut over all the penstemons and am just about to prune the summer flowering ceanothus and tender buddleija crispa.  There are paths to be swept and this year in particular with the high winds the leaves have been particularly abundant and seem to get everywhere. 

Expectations are high for a wonderful gardening year and am much looking forward to welcoming our first visitors on April 2nd.

 

February 2017

by ANNE CHAMBERS

Home again after a wonderful break in the sunshine; warmth on the skin and no thoughts of gardening!

I visited the RHS Spring Show in London last week for the first time in years and much enjoyed the intimate atmosphere and displays of spring bulbs.  Some excellent nurseries were displaying including my favourite lily nursery H.W. Hyde and Son.  Also Avon Bulbs with a vast array of snowdrops with price tags to match!  I fell for some reticulate irises and a beautiful new hellebore called Ice Cream which is now planted by our front door.

Hellebore Ice Cream

Hellebore Ice Cream

Robert our son has taught himself (with help from the internet!) the basics of dry stone walling.  He has started on an old wall that had collapsed surrounding our log yard and any weekend he is home will find him there. A public footpath runs alongside the wall and walkers and well-wishers stop to give encouragement and advice. Apparently the most common bon-mot is ‘once picked, never to put down a piece of stone until a place has been found for it in the wall’. Great progress has been made and rather like a jigsaw it is all coming together.

Dry stone walling

Dry stone walling

I visited my first NGS garden this year on Sunday at nearby Stretton on Fosse.  A lovely mild weekend and lots of people out and about.  My good friend Penny has created a wonderful winter garden which was looking stunning and full of interest and colour.  The scent from her daphne Jacqueline Postill was fantastic and filled the air, surrounded by hellebores and early spring bulbs.  A real treat and very clever to have so much to see so early in the season.

Daphne Jacqueline Postill

Daphne Jacqueline Postill

We are busy preparing for another season too. The swimming pool has been re-painted, the tree surgeon has been and gone and the large terracotta pots have been unwrapped to reveal the tulips poking through the soil .Everything is on the move, as must we!

 

January 2017

by Anne Chambers

A very Happy New Year to everyone.  We had a busy Christmas with five children under four years old staying so as you can imagine lots of noise and fun!

Now into January which so far has been damp and grey with the occasional hard frost but no snow so far.  We did a count of all the flowers in the garden on New Year’s Day (see photo) but were slightly dismayed to see in the newspaper that on Tresco in the Isles of Scilly they had over three hundred plants in bloom!  We could only manage around twenty.

New Year flowers

New Year flowers

 

We worked off our Christmas excess by digging up brambles in the bluebell wood, luckily a sunny dry cold period,  but as it faces south we were stripped down to our shirtsleeves even at this time of year.  It is amazing how they grow each year even though it is an annual chore, but worth it as otherwise they would choke all the bluebells which are spectacular in May.

Brambles galore

Brambles galore

 

We are off to warmer climes next week as have been asked by some friends to their house in the Caribbean, very spoiling and am looking forward to some warmth and recharging our batteries ready for another season.

The gardeners are progressing well with the pruning and digging over of the borders and are just about to tackle the steep banks which are covered with pine needles after the gales.  The pines are magnificent but they do have the drawback of the needles which seem to scatter themselves everywhere at this time of year.

Hopefully by the time we return the snowdrops will be out and the evenings that little bit lighter so we will be on the run up to Spring.